NEWS HOME >> NEWS

More than $15 billion worth of coffee is exported each year.


More than $15 billion worth of coffee is exported each year. 

That makes it the second most traded commodity in the world, behind only oil.

 The majority of this coffee grows between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, 

but most of the world’s coffee is consumed in countries located 

well beyond beyond that stretch of the globe often referred to as The Bean Belt. 

Wherever beans may be sent after cultivation, they’re almost surely shipped in the 

nigh-ubiquitous, intermodal, internationally-standardized shipping container. 


These corrugated steel boxes have been used to ship coffee

 around the world since the 1950s. More recently, they’re also being used to sell coffee.





Shipping container architecture is not new. While on some level, 

it’s probably been around as long as the shipping container, 

their use by architects as buildingsized, habitable bricks first entered the design 

zeitgeist around 10 years ago. Containers have since been used as 

everything from popup boutiques to nomadic museums. While it may present 

a new set of opportunities and challenges, as a piece of architecture, 

it’s frankly not that interesting. 




There’s only so much you can do with a modular box. 

But it’s not about design, not really. As a building material,

 the shipping container is a means to an end, a way of exploring new 

ideas and to begin to think differently about space and consumption.

 That’s why we’re seeing so much of it lately. 




As peopleand businesseshave become more interested in sustainability,

 the idea of an relatively cheap “green” building has become more appealing.

 Container Cafe kitted out with the required catering equipment, 

serves locally sourced coffee, handmade sandwiches and a selection 

of other lunchtime treats. Sitting within landscaped grounds, 

The Set Cafe is an enticing lunchtime hangout that encourages 

office workers to get outside and stretch their legs.